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Best Truck Accident Lawyers in Lexington

The nursing homes in Kentucky have problems — and advocates for residents say that no one in the government is doing anything to fix them.

Federal law is somewhat vague about the staffing requirements for nursing homes, leaving it mostly up to the states to pass legislation that is more specific. Kentucky, however, has not done so. Efforts to pass a 2017 bill that would have required a mandatory minimum staff fell flat. Those opposed — who largely represent the nursing homes’ interests — said that Kentucky’s nursing homes simply couldn’t manage it. The bill would have required just a single nurse for every 21 patients during daylight hours and one nurse’s aide for every 10 patients.

In essence, the lack of legislation leaves Kentucky’s nursing homes able to set their own minimum staffing levels — and they prefer it that way. According to a rating system used by the United States Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 43 percent of the state’s nursing homes were rated either “much below” or “below” average when it came to the type of care they provide their residents. That puts Kentucky toward the bottom of the national list.

Hospitals are incredibly busy places, and mistakes happen all the time. Nurses, doctors and aides are often overloaded with too many patients to handle, so you simply can’t assume that everyone who walks into your room understands your medical condition or why you are being treated.

You need to take steps to protect yourself from medical errors whenever you’re in a hospital, whether you’re there for surgery, testing, or some other condition.

1. Bring someone with you.

If pediatricians have their way, the baby walker will soon be a relic of the past.

Baby walkers have traditionally been seen as the perfect toy for a curious infant. Parents were able to let their infants explore a little, convinced they were both safe and picking up a little help learning to walk.

In reality, baby walkers are incredibly dangerous for infants. In addition, they may even contribute to developmental delays — rather than promoting coordination and walking. If pediatricians have their way, baby walkers will soon be thing of the past. They’re already strongly urging parents to get rid of any walkers that they currently have.

If you are a Kentucky driver, you understand there are various hazards and safety threats on the road that could lead to a higher chance of an accident. From distraction to speeding, the actions of other motorists could be a direct threat on your own personal safety and well-being. One of these potential threats is a fatigued truck driver.

Truckers play a crucial role in the American economy. They transport goods across the country and make sure products get to where they need to go, but they also have the responsibility to drive safely and adhere to industry regulations. There are strict rules in place regarding how long a person can drive a truck. While many truckers and trucking companies play by the rules, some of them deliberately ignore the rules.

How serious is the problem?

In Kentucky, a law that requires every medical malpractice case to go through a review panel to determine if it has enough merit to proceed has been in effect for just a year — and it already seems broken.

It’s also facing lawsuits that challenge its validity under the Kentucky Constitution. The law drastically slows down the process for plaintiffs who are seeking to obtain a measure of justice through a medical malpractice case — and that would seem to fly in the face of the constitution, which says that everyone has the right to their day in court without delay.

Those who back the law say that the panel system is needed to prevent injured patients from filing supposedly “frivolous” lawsuits, even though there is no evidence that frivolous suits are being filed in Kentucky. They say that putting every case through a panel of medical professionals would help make sure that only cases with merit make it to court, although there are already numerous existing protections to ensure that truly meritless cases are not filed or do not go to trial if they are. After all, the whole point of the court system is the help resolve disputes where the parties don’t agree.

Spinal cord injuries are among the most traumatic events that can happen to a person’s body. They create ongoing complications that go far beyond even the physical devastation of the initial injury.

While anyone can appreciate the enormous consequences of a spinal cord injury on someone’s life, most people aren’t aware of the additional health problems that are common when someone is immobile.

Immediately after a spinal cord injury, medical care tends to be focused on trying to get the patient into a stable condition. Occasionally, surgery to try to lessen the patient’s injury or reduce pressure on a nerve bundle is warranted early on in a case. Most of the ongoing medical care, however, tends to focus on rehabilitation and adaptive medicine.

It isn’t hard to understand why the drivers of passenger cars get nervous when they’re sharing the road with a big rig. The size and weight of a commercial vehicle pretty much guarantee that any accident, if it happens, will be a bad one.

Learn more about some of the top problems that lead to many truck accidents and become more conscious of your role in highway safety.

1. Maintenance issues

Kentuckians with medical malpractice claims have been fighting an uphill battle since the rollout of a new law aimed to protect physicians.

In 2016, Kentucky passed a law that sought to reduce the number of frivolous lawsuits against medical providers. The impetus of the Medical Review Panel (MRP) Act was the rising cost of medical malpractice insurance for providers. To cut down on the number of lawsuits, patients pursuing a medical malpractice case would first have their case screened by a panel of experts. The panel would then advise the patient, who would be able to move forward regardless of the panel’s advice.

According to the Courier Journal, the panels have seen significant delays.

If you are like many people here in Kentucky, summer means getting out on the water. Perhaps you have been looking forward to this time of year since winter. Now that you are out on the water, soaking up the sun with family and friends, you couldn’t be happier.

Then, out of nowhere, disaster strikes. Another recreational boat slammed into yours. Not only was your boat damaged, but you also suffered serious injuries. Sadly, this happens more often than you would think. According to the U.S. Coast Guard, 4,158 boating accidents occurred in 2015. In those crashes, 2,613 injuries occurred and 626 people died.

What does the data say causes boating accidents?

You’ve probably heard horror stories about patients who have been victims of “wrong site, wrong surgery” injuries. Those are situations where something happens like the surgeon operates on a patient’s left elbow instead of the right, or performs a knee replacement on a patient who was supposed to have a hernia repaired.

Unlike many modern horror stories and urban legends, these kinds of stories are actually true — and they happen far more often than most people think. While it’s supposed to be the job of the hospital and surgeon to get things right, patients are wise to do everything they can to avoid falling victim to this type of negligence.

So, what can you do? Before your next surgery, take the following steps:

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